This edition temp out of stock


$20.00 excl postage


$36.00 excl postage



Order your books directly from Tim through the "Connect with Tim" page. Kindle versions are available through Amazon.com


Tim's Books.


 In June of 2013, Three Sips of Gin was republished in a revised "DELUXE EDITION" inclusive of some 120 photographs - many of which have never been seen  before . The book has become a best seller and is widely acclaimed around the world.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“An absorbing and amusing chronicle of a young man's adventures on an African continent at war with itself. The author‘s self-deprecating and light hearted account of his involvement in Rhodesia’s shadowy bush war belies the great bravery and distinction with which he fought and which I personally was privileged to witness.”
Lt. Col. Ron Reid-Daly. MBE, CLM, OSB.
Commanding Officer: Selous Scouts Regiment. 
“A fascinating account and an essential read about pre-independent Africa. Although an outstanding officer of extraordinary ability, Tim’s hilarious recollections of war and peace are awash with the light hearted wit and humor for which he will always be remembered. A unique and compelling memoir.”
Lieutenant Colonel Charles Aust.
Commanding Officer: Rhodesian Light Infantry. 

“A remarkable book, about a remarkable period, involving a remarkable person. A great read.”
Jeremy Strong. 



In Three Sips of Gin Tim gives a fascinating and humorous insight into the decadent lifestyle that prevailed in East Africa during the author’s childhood and of the realm of the remote boarding school where status amongst schoolboys was determined not by achievements within the classroom, but by more notable deeds worthy of schoolboy lore. After a brief journey away from Africa, we return with Tim to an African continent at war with itself. We accompany him as a young officer with the Rhodesian Light Infantry into the exclusivity, glamour and frivolity of the Officers Mess then into the cauldron and confusion of some of his more memorable operations. Later, with Tim as a member of the famed Selous Scouts, we follow him into the silence of the shadows to share in the often painful moments of an insurgency fought in the stark and unforgiving harshness of the African bush. Here you will find the significance of three sips of gin finally revealed. Later with Tim having left the Rhodesian Army, we share in the hilarious absurdity of his service with South Africa’s 5 Reconnaissance Regiment, then in the humour of him stumbling his way through the intrigues, excesses and scandals of the boardroom of a large multi-national company based in South Africa. But above all, we share with Tim in the laughter, candor, wit and self-deprecating humour of an extraordinary and intriguing adventure.



 In "Who Will Teach the Wisdom” Tim gives a compelling and factual account of his recent involvement preparing a Special Operations team for a mission to Africa to eradicate a group of insurgents. Tim’s narrative begins in a remote jungle training camp deep within the rain forests of Puerto Rico but has as its source the wisdom of Africa. There are no easy missions but this Special Forces mission was successful because it was a mission carried out in Africa using the wisdom of Africa as its Genesis. More important, unlike most previous counter-insurgency operations, no more insurgents succeeded in gaining a foothold in the tribal area in which the mission was carried out. This was because the same wisdom that was used in finding the insurgents was used in eradicating them. Of even greater interest, Tim shares with his readers the wisdom that made the Special Operations mission to Africa so successful and in so doing, reveals the fascinating mystery of what enabled the famed Selous Scouts, of which Tim was a leading member, to be so successful in hunting down and eliminating terrorist gangs. The terrorists’ became so terrorized by the Selous scouts that they were too afraid even to mention the unit’s name. They referred to its soldiers simply as skuz’apo, or ‘those who have stolen our identity’.

.


Tim's Books